House Project Exhibition @H Project Space | Bangkok

On the 23rd August 2012, the particpants of The House Project celebrated the opening of the exhibition of works at the H Project Space, Bangkok, Thailand.

P R E S S   R E L E A S E 

‘If I was the Architect of a ‘Dream House’

The House Project uses representations — drawing, painting, photography, assemblage, 3D construction, objects and the moving image — to engage with an extraordinary house, which has been growing and collapsing over a period of eighteen years, on the ashes of a previous house.

The current house should not be judged as a failed house, nor as a pictur- esque, eccentric urban ruin; but as a singular, complex, tragic and (in some ways) exemplary work of the imagination. Not contrived as art works often are, and not as tasteful as ‘Art Brut’ tends to be, the house expresses its tragic existential situation through both its structure and its materiality. More ‘house of dreams’ than material house.

In The Poetics of Space Bachelard reminds us that ‘there exists for each one of us an oneiric house, a house of dream-memory, that is lost in the shadow of the real past… the crypt of the house where we were born in’. For most of us this imaginary house only exist in our minds, if we allow it to manifest itself at all…

Khun A., the owner, architect and builder of this house, is aware that, as it stands, his house is not suitable for living in (not ready, yet). But he has not given up. ‘Everything is under control’, he remarked, when he politely declined our offer of help.

Through our encounters with Khun A., and from engaging with his house, over a year, we noticed that, behind this fragile structure and complex geometry — and irrespective of its failure as a dwelling — the house could be

inspirational in an exemplary and humbling way: as the expression of a man’s life and resilience, of his memories and his aspirations, in symbolic form.

The fact that the process of building the house has lasted over a period of eighteen years (and is still on-going) suggests an extra-ordinary resilience on the part of Khun A., a feat that we do not feel we would be capable of. Modern Sisyphus — victim and hero ?

The 3D structure in the middle of the gallery does not attempt to represent the house but alludes to the challenge of creating permanence out of pure will and fantasy.

In Pattern Language Christopher Alexander suggests that, in architecture,

‘The most effective structure will be… a continuous structure, in which all members are rigidly connected in such a way that each member carries at least some part of the stresses caused by any pattern of loading’

This principle is violated by the house, at every step; for there, discontinuity and fragmentation are the norm. Ironically, it is fully realized in the common Thai ’fashee’ — reminiscent of the woven structures found in some African willow and mud houses and in the design of modern tents.

The inevitability of the house’s collapse is alluded to in a photomontage, various postcards and photographic records of our looking, echoed in three plastic and one woven ‘fashees’, transformed as architectural models.

The exhibition takes the form of a polylogue: a dialogue of many voices, set up and around an emblematic wooden structure, onto which footage of Khun A. is projected, and around which a variety of visual propositions crystallizes our individual concerns and approaches: postcards, drawings, etchings, photographs, paintings, assemblages, documentation and texts.

On the floor, a collection of drawers are scattered: with notes of our journey, proofs, fragments….

The exhibition invites you to enter the polylogue and leave your mark, in any way you see fit.

The House Project developed from staff research seminars led by visiting professor Gérard Mermoz at King Mongkut’s University, in July-August 2011.

The House Project is: Gérard Mermoz (lead artist and project curator), Associate Professor Nigel Power, who set up the scheme, participating artists: Michael Croft, Checksant Gangakate, Simon Labalestier, (Communication De- sign); Voraprada Vorantanachai and Akararat Songwattanayothin (students, Communication Design), David Murgala (Architecture).

Our grateful thanks go to King Mongkut’s University, who generously funded the project, to Brian Curtin curator of H Project Space and to H at Gallery H, who kindly gave hospitality to the House Project.

G.M. 22.08.2012

promotional flyer | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

More information can be found at  The House Project Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

Opening Night | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

© photographic postcards Simon Larbalestier | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

© photographic postcards Simon Larbalestier | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

© photographic postcards Simon Larbalestier | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

© photographic postcards Simon Larbalestier | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

© photographic postcards Simon Larbalestier | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

© photographic postcards Simon Larbalestier | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

© photographic postcards Simon Larbalestier | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

 

 

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My photographs from the Intimately exhibition @ H Gallery, Bangkok, Thailand

Seven prints were selected by Brian Curtin for inclusion in the Intimately exhibition currently still running at H Gallery, Bangkok, Thailand. The gallery is located within an old Thai style house and is personally my favourite place for displaying my prints in Bangkok. The prints themselves were made by Mark Ogaslert, director of Bloom Pro Lab, Bangkok – designated my official South East Asian printer.

Long Gun, Bangkok, 2011, from the series Alphaville part-1, giclée photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 60cm x 46cm, image size 48cm x 32cm

Pedroes, Bangkok, 2011, from the series Alphaville part-1, giclée photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 60cm x 46cm, image size 49cm x 32cm

Memento Mori, Chaiyaphum Province, Bangkok, 2011, from the series Relic, giclée photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 59cm x 46cm, image size 48cm x 32cm

Slobbie Bar, Chungju, Korea, 2012, from the series Alphaville part-2, giclée photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 62cm x 43cm, image size 48cm x 31cm

Touch Bar, Chungju, Korea, 2012, from the series Alphaville part-2, giclée photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 62cm x 43cm, image size 49cm x 32cm

Stairway, Chungju, Korea, 2012, from the series Narrow Exit, giclée photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 62cm x 43cm, image size 48cm x 32cm

Korean BBQ restaurant, Chungju, Korea, 2012, from the series Alphaville part-2, giclée photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 65cm x 46cm, image size 54cm x 32cm

Opening Night, “Intimately” H Gallery | Bangkok | Thailand | August 2012

 

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Intimately | curated by Brian Curtin@ H Gallery, Bangkok, Thailand

H GALLERY BANGKOK

 

INTIMATELY

Curated by Brian Curtin

 

August 2 – August 27 2012

Hanspeter Ammann/Tada Hengsapkul/Simon Larbalestier/Viet Le/Liam Morgan/Imhathai Suwatthanasilp/Waswo X. Waswo

 

Bangkok, Thailand. H Gallery Bangkok is very pleased to announce a group exhibition of photography that explores intimacy as a vexed rather than an assured relationship between people. Intimacy is typically understood as a state that can claim insights and understandings which are not generally accessible and are therefore all the more valuable. But, inspired by a number of examples across art, literature and film, this exhibition explores how the pursuit of intimacy can lead to estrangement, divergent desires and confusion, amongst other unpredicted responses.

The title, Intimately, is a qualifier rather than a statement, suggesting a certain lack of definitiveness and an invite to question or debate.

 

Intimately opens with mix of works by Tada Hengsapkul that explore the performative dimensions of physical intimacy with ideas about seduction, power and even disgust. Viet Le challenges how we might decide the terms of closeness and, therefore, distance in personal encounters with others. Imhathai Suwatthanasilp contemplates a relationship between intimate self-reflection and self-effacement; and Hanspeter Ammann plays with a sublimation of the unruly desires that can attend the pursuit of intimacy. Simon Larbalestier and Liam Morgan seek reflections of private experience in the world at large. And Waswo X. Waswo humorously explodes the politics of what is means to conflate intimacy with understanding.

The very notion of intimacy relates to ideas about the nature of photography, in terms of proximity and privileged knowledge. The artists in Intimately employ various types of photography, including snapshot, portraiture, theatrical, and historical. But, like the relationships explored – between the subjects of the works, the photographer and our engagement – questions and challenges, not closure, provide the order of understanding.

 

PR: Dr. Brian Curtin /  +66(0) 8 9 1638102 /  curtin.brian@gmail.com

H GALLERY BANGKOK (MAIN PROGRAM)

H PROJECT SPACE  (2ND FLOOR AT H GALLERY)

201 SATHORN 12, BANGKOK 10500 ph: + 66 850215508 www.hgallerybkk.com

Intimately exhibition poster

Intimately email invite

© Waswo X. Waswo A Local Photographer and his Wife, 2007, black and white digital photograph hand-colored by Rajesh Soni, 61 x 40.6 cm

© Simon Larbalestier “Long Gun”, Bangkok, 2011, from the series “Alphaville part-1”, giclée
photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 60cm x 46cm,
image size 48cm x 32cm

© Simon Larbalestier Pedroes, Bangkok, 2011, from the series ” Alphaville part-1″, giclée photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 60cm x 46cm, image size 49cm x 32cm

 

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Chaos, Flux, Pleasure and Decay | Brian Curtin in conversation with photographer Simon Larbalestier.

In the November issue (no 176) of Thailand’s art magazine art4d, I share some of the latest project ideas with Brian Curtin, curator of the recent “Surface Depth” exhibition at the H Gallery in Bangkok.

Chaos, Flux, Pleasure and Decay pages 66-67

Chaos, Flux, Pleasure and Decay | pages 66-67

Chaos, Flux, Pleasure and Decay | pages 68-69

Chaos, Flux, Pleasure and Decay | page 66 (detail)

Chaos, Flux, Pleasure and Decay | page 67 (detail)

Chaos, Flux, Pleasure and Decay | page 68 (detail)

Chaos, Flux, Pleasure and Decay | page 69 (detail)

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Surface Depth Exhibition, H Gallery, Bangkok.

SURFACE DEPTH Curated by Brian Curtin

H Gallery, Bangkok  September 2-30, 2010

Heman Chong

Dutton and Swindells

Adam James

Simon Larbalestier

Simrin Mehra-Agarwal

Olivier Pin-Fat

Nigel Power

Arin Rungjang

Sutthirat Supaparinya

Noraset Vaisayakul

Pornpraseart Yamazaki

H Gallery is very pleased to announce an international exhibition of artists who highlight the physical form of representation. Including a diverse array of media and methods – sound, text, photography, installation and painting – Surface Depth explores how form guides significance, concealing as well as revealing and shifting and altering the familiar or expected in ever-new and provocative directions. All the artists address the broad contexts of representation in terms of the popular and the elite and the political and the personal. In a local context where representation remains a volatile means of expression, Surface Depth promises a nuanced and critical view of how it is intended that we understand, and therefore reflect on, the world we live in. The diversity of the artists is a key to the impact of Surface Depth and includes recent Bangkok émigré Simon Larbalestier, famed for his photographs for music albums, and Arin Rungjang, whose work with space and representation has been selected for inclusion in the 3rd Singapore Biennale 2011. As well as Thailand, the artists hail from New York, Britain and Italy.

H Gallery, 201 Sathorn 12, Bangkok 10500,

Telephone  + 66 81 310 4428

www.hgallerybkk.com

Sponsored by NIST (New International School of Thailand) with special thank you to Val McCubbin

Four of my prints are in this show details shown below:

Surface Depth Opening Night 02/09/2010 H Gallery Sathorn Soi 12, Bangkok, Thailand

Surface Depth Opening Night 02/09/2010 H Gallery Sathorn Soi 12, Bangkok, Thailand

Surface Depth Opening Night 02/09/2010 H Gallery Sathorn Soi 12, Bangkok, Thailand

Surface Depth curated by Brian Curtin H Gallery Sathorn Soi 12, Bangkok, Thailand.

Far Left: Minotaur Centre: Cuban Right: Simon Larbalestier 2010, ‘Luxury’ from The 5th Quandrant series C-type Archival Lightjet (printed chemically on Kodak Chromira), floated between two pieces of 4mm glass and wood. Signed, numbered and titled on the verso. 1/10 41.5" x 54.5" (105.4cm x 138.4cm)

Simon Larbalestier 2010, ‘Phoenix’ from The A L P H A V I L L E series C-type Archival Lightjet (printed chemically on Kodak Chromira), floated between two pieces of 4mm glass and wood. Signed, numbered and titled on the verso. 1/10 41.5" x 54.5" (105.4cm x 138.4cm)

Simon Larbalestier 2009/2010, ‘Minotaur’ from The Minotaur series C-type Archival Lightjet (printed chemically on Kodak Chromira), floated between two pieces of 4mm glass and wood. Signed, numbered and titled on the verso. 1/10 41.5" x 54.5" (105.4cm x 138.4cm)

Simon Larbalestier 2009, ‘Cuban’ from The Minotaur series C-type Archival Lightjet (printed chemically on Kodak Chromira), floated between two pieces of 4mm glass and wood. Signed, numbered and titled on the verso. 1/10 41.5" x 54.5" (105.4cm x 138.4cm)

Simon Larbalestier 2010, ‘Luxury’ from The 5th Quandrant series C-type Archival Lightjet (printed chemically on Kodak Chromira), floated between two pieces of 4mm glass and wood. Signed, numbered and titled on the verso. 1/10 41.5" x 54.5" (105.4cm x 138.4cm)

Simon Larbalestier 2010, ‘Phoenix’ from The A L P H A V I L L E series C-type Archival Lightjet (printed chemically on Kodak Chromira), floated between two pieces of 4mm glass and wood. Signed, numbered and titled on the verso. 1/10 41.5" x 54.5" (105.4cm x 138.4cm)

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