Recent Exhibition and New Work from Korea “I Can Be Somewhere Else While Staying Here”

Intro image for the series "I Can Be Somewhere Else While Staying Here" from the recent exhibition: "Thinking Media 2", Gongpyeong Gallery, Seoul Art, Center, Seoul, Korea © Simon Larbalestier©

Intro image for the series “I Can Be Somewhere Else While Staying Here” from the recent exhibition: “Thinking Media 2”, Gongpyeong Gallery, Seoul Art, Center, Seoul, Korea © Simon Larbalestier

A series of photographs representing evidential documents of places I have momentarily inhabited, whilst experiencing a strong sense of personal displacement, both physically and psychologically. The combination of an aesthetic that utilizes an analogue retro-framing of digitally captured imagery, further enhances this state of displacement. Time stamp notations on each image serve as a reminder that the reading of a photographs is always retrospective, and acknowledges the notion, that the passing of time is always referenced in the present moment. The content of the photographs record fragmented details of unfamiliar texts, abandoned objects of sedentary interior comforts, disembodied or malformed vegetation, bicycles, foggy landscapes or habitats that are in states of decay. Simon Larbalestier, December 2012

The text is sourced from Merleau-Ponty’s “Phenomenology of Perception” (1945)

The text is sourced from Merleau-Ponty’s “Phenomenology of Perception” (1945)

Some of these photographs were recently exhibited at the Gongpyeong Gallery, Seoul Art Center, Korea (12-18th December 2012) in an exhibition entitled “Thinking Media 2” along with a list of the following invited artists: (Alphabetical Order) CHOI iL (Korea), Jung Hee CHOI (USA), Michael CROFT (UK), Anna CYBELE  (USA), Jung-Chul HUR (Korea), KANG You Ran (Korea), Ahram KWON (Korea), JUNG Kyuho (Korea), Simon Larbalestier (UK), Jack MALIPAN (Poland), David MRUGALA (Germany), Nikos PAPDIMITRIOU (Greece) and Jinsik SHIN (Korea)

The following images are from the catalogue, the exhibition and cropped details of my work.

 

Thinking Media 2 catalogue

Thinking Media 2 catalogue designed by Jinsik SHIN

My catalogue page introducing the concept of my project entitled "I can Be Somewhere Else  While Staying Here"

My catalogue page introducing the concept of my project entitled “I can Be Somewhere Else While Staying Here”

 

Exhibition reference images

Exhibition Reference Images

Exhibition reference images

Exhibition Reference Images

"I Can Be Somewhere Else While Staying Here"  (detail) from the recent exhibition: "Thinking Media 2", Gongpyeong Gallery, Seoul Art, Center, Seoul, Korea © Simon Larbalestier

“I Can Be Somewhere Else While Staying Here” (detail) from the recent exhibition: “Thinking Media 2”, Gongpyeong Gallery, Seoul Art, Center, Seoul, Korea © Simon Larbalestier

"I Can Be Somewhere Else While Staying Here"  (detail) from the recent exhibition: "Thinking Media 2", Gongpyeong Gallery, Seoul Art, Center, Seoul, Korea © Simon Larbalestier

“I Can Be Somewhere Else While Staying Here” (detail) from the recent exhibition: “Thinking Media 2”, Gongpyeong Gallery, Seoul Art, Center, Seoul, Korea © Simon Larbalestier

 

Exhibition Reference Image; left side, my work, right side: Micheal Croft

Exhibition Reference Image; left side, my work, right side: Micheal Croft

 

 

 

 

 

 

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House Project Exhibition @H Project Space | Bangkok

On the 23rd August 2012, the particpants of The House Project celebrated the opening of the exhibition of works at the H Project Space, Bangkok, Thailand.

P R E S S   R E L E A S E 

‘If I was the Architect of a ‘Dream House’

The House Project uses representations — drawing, painting, photography, assemblage, 3D construction, objects and the moving image — to engage with an extraordinary house, which has been growing and collapsing over a period of eighteen years, on the ashes of a previous house.

The current house should not be judged as a failed house, nor as a pictur- esque, eccentric urban ruin; but as a singular, complex, tragic and (in some ways) exemplary work of the imagination. Not contrived as art works often are, and not as tasteful as ‘Art Brut’ tends to be, the house expresses its tragic existential situation through both its structure and its materiality. More ‘house of dreams’ than material house.

In The Poetics of Space Bachelard reminds us that ‘there exists for each one of us an oneiric house, a house of dream-memory, that is lost in the shadow of the real past… the crypt of the house where we were born in’. For most of us this imaginary house only exist in our minds, if we allow it to manifest itself at all…

Khun A., the owner, architect and builder of this house, is aware that, as it stands, his house is not suitable for living in (not ready, yet). But he has not given up. ‘Everything is under control’, he remarked, when he politely declined our offer of help.

Through our encounters with Khun A., and from engaging with his house, over a year, we noticed that, behind this fragile structure and complex geometry — and irrespective of its failure as a dwelling — the house could be

inspirational in an exemplary and humbling way: as the expression of a man’s life and resilience, of his memories and his aspirations, in symbolic form.

The fact that the process of building the house has lasted over a period of eighteen years (and is still on-going) suggests an extra-ordinary resilience on the part of Khun A., a feat that we do not feel we would be capable of. Modern Sisyphus — victim and hero ?

The 3D structure in the middle of the gallery does not attempt to represent the house but alludes to the challenge of creating permanence out of pure will and fantasy.

In Pattern Language Christopher Alexander suggests that, in architecture,

‘The most effective structure will be… a continuous structure, in which all members are rigidly connected in such a way that each member carries at least some part of the stresses caused by any pattern of loading’

This principle is violated by the house, at every step; for there, discontinuity and fragmentation are the norm. Ironically, it is fully realized in the common Thai ’fashee’ — reminiscent of the woven structures found in some African willow and mud houses and in the design of modern tents.

The inevitability of the house’s collapse is alluded to in a photomontage, various postcards and photographic records of our looking, echoed in three plastic and one woven ‘fashees’, transformed as architectural models.

The exhibition takes the form of a polylogue: a dialogue of many voices, set up and around an emblematic wooden structure, onto which footage of Khun A. is projected, and around which a variety of visual propositions crystallizes our individual concerns and approaches: postcards, drawings, etchings, photographs, paintings, assemblages, documentation and texts.

On the floor, a collection of drawers are scattered: with notes of our journey, proofs, fragments….

The exhibition invites you to enter the polylogue and leave your mark, in any way you see fit.

The House Project developed from staff research seminars led by visiting professor Gérard Mermoz at King Mongkut’s University, in July-August 2011.

The House Project is: Gérard Mermoz (lead artist and project curator), Associate Professor Nigel Power, who set up the scheme, participating artists: Michael Croft, Checksant Gangakate, Simon Labalestier, (Communication De- sign); Voraprada Vorantanachai and Akararat Songwattanayothin (students, Communication Design), David Murgala (Architecture).

Our grateful thanks go to King Mongkut’s University, who generously funded the project, to Brian Curtin curator of H Project Space and to H at Gallery H, who kindly gave hospitality to the House Project.

G.M. 22.08.2012

promotional flyer | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

More information can be found at  The House Project Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

Opening Night | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

© photographic postcards Simon Larbalestier | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

© photographic postcards Simon Larbalestier | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

© photographic postcards Simon Larbalestier | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

© photographic postcards Simon Larbalestier | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

© photographic postcards Simon Larbalestier | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

© photographic postcards Simon Larbalestier | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

© photographic postcards Simon Larbalestier | The House Project | H Project Space Bangkok

 

 

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My photographs from the Intimately exhibition @ H Gallery, Bangkok, Thailand

Seven prints were selected by Brian Curtin for inclusion in the Intimately exhibition currently still running at H Gallery, Bangkok, Thailand. The gallery is located within an old Thai style house and is personally my favourite place for displaying my prints in Bangkok. The prints themselves were made by Mark Ogaslert, director of Bloom Pro Lab, Bangkok – designated my official South East Asian printer.

Long Gun, Bangkok, 2011, from the series Alphaville part-1, giclée photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 60cm x 46cm, image size 48cm x 32cm

Pedroes, Bangkok, 2011, from the series Alphaville part-1, giclée photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 60cm x 46cm, image size 49cm x 32cm

Memento Mori, Chaiyaphum Province, Bangkok, 2011, from the series Relic, giclée photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 59cm x 46cm, image size 48cm x 32cm

Slobbie Bar, Chungju, Korea, 2012, from the series Alphaville part-2, giclée photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 62cm x 43cm, image size 48cm x 31cm

Touch Bar, Chungju, Korea, 2012, from the series Alphaville part-2, giclée photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 62cm x 43cm, image size 49cm x 32cm

Stairway, Chungju, Korea, 2012, from the series Narrow Exit, giclée photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 62cm x 43cm, image size 48cm x 32cm

Korean BBQ restaurant, Chungju, Korea, 2012, from the series Alphaville part-2, giclée photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 65cm x 46cm, image size 54cm x 32cm

Opening Night, “Intimately” H Gallery | Bangkok | Thailand | August 2012

 

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Intimately | curated by Brian Curtin@ H Gallery, Bangkok, Thailand

H GALLERY BANGKOK

 

INTIMATELY

Curated by Brian Curtin

 

August 2 – August 27 2012

Hanspeter Ammann/Tada Hengsapkul/Simon Larbalestier/Viet Le/Liam Morgan/Imhathai Suwatthanasilp/Waswo X. Waswo

 

Bangkok, Thailand. H Gallery Bangkok is very pleased to announce a group exhibition of photography that explores intimacy as a vexed rather than an assured relationship between people. Intimacy is typically understood as a state that can claim insights and understandings which are not generally accessible and are therefore all the more valuable. But, inspired by a number of examples across art, literature and film, this exhibition explores how the pursuit of intimacy can lead to estrangement, divergent desires and confusion, amongst other unpredicted responses.

The title, Intimately, is a qualifier rather than a statement, suggesting a certain lack of definitiveness and an invite to question or debate.

 

Intimately opens with mix of works by Tada Hengsapkul that explore the performative dimensions of physical intimacy with ideas about seduction, power and even disgust. Viet Le challenges how we might decide the terms of closeness and, therefore, distance in personal encounters with others. Imhathai Suwatthanasilp contemplates a relationship between intimate self-reflection and self-effacement; and Hanspeter Ammann plays with a sublimation of the unruly desires that can attend the pursuit of intimacy. Simon Larbalestier and Liam Morgan seek reflections of private experience in the world at large. And Waswo X. Waswo humorously explodes the politics of what is means to conflate intimacy with understanding.

The very notion of intimacy relates to ideas about the nature of photography, in terms of proximity and privileged knowledge. The artists in Intimately employ various types of photography, including snapshot, portraiture, theatrical, and historical. But, like the relationships explored – between the subjects of the works, the photographer and our engagement – questions and challenges, not closure, provide the order of understanding.

 

PR: Dr. Brian Curtin /  +66(0) 8 9 1638102 /  curtin.brian@gmail.com

H GALLERY BANGKOK (MAIN PROGRAM)

H PROJECT SPACE  (2ND FLOOR AT H GALLERY)

201 SATHORN 12, BANGKOK 10500 ph: + 66 850215508 www.hgallerybkk.com

Intimately exhibition poster

Intimately email invite

© Waswo X. Waswo A Local Photographer and his Wife, 2007, black and white digital photograph hand-colored by Rajesh Soni, 61 x 40.6 cm

© Simon Larbalestier “Long Gun”, Bangkok, 2011, from the series “Alphaville part-1”, giclée
photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 60cm x 46cm,
image size 48cm x 32cm

© Simon Larbalestier Pedroes, Bangkok, 2011, from the series ” Alphaville part-1″, giclée photograph mounted on board, numbered 1/25, paper size 60cm x 46cm, image size 49cm x 32cm

 

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Thinking Media | Professor’s Exhibition @Konkuk University, GLOCAL Campus, Chungju, Korea

Thinking Media
Opening: 16th June 2012
Convention hall, Konkuk University, GLOCAL Campus, Chungju, Korea
Invited Artists
Jung Hee Choi (USA)
Michael CROFT (UK)
Jung-Chul HUR (Korea)
Simon LARBALESTIER (UK)
Jack MALIPAN (Poland)
David MRUGALA (Germany)
Nikos PAPADIMITRIOU (Greece)
Jinsik SHIN (Korea)
“The Audio-visual presentation brings together a number of creative individuals who form a collective at this moment in time exploring visual methodologies around  diversity of media. Such media includes photography, video, interactive mixed media, sound, performance, digital montage, architecture, painting, drawing, and text based imagery. These artists represent international interests between Asia, Europe and USA”

Left side: Michael Croft | Right side: Simon Larbalestier,  projections (dimensions variable) Thinking Media Exhibition, Konkuk University, GLOCAL Campus, Chungju, Korea

Left side: Michael Croft | Right side: Simon Larbalestier projections (dimensions variable) Thinking Media Exhibition, Konkuk University, GLOCAL Campus, Chungju, Korea

Left side: Michael Croft | Right side: Simon Larbalestier projections (dimensions variable) Thinking Media Exhibition, Konkuk University, GLOCAL Campus, Chungju, Korea

“Project Tank” Simon Larbalestier, projection (dimensions variable) Thinking Media Exhibition, Konkuk University, GLOCAL Campus, Chungju, Korea

 

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Chuncheon International Mime Festival 2012, South Korea.

Chuncheon International Mime Festival 2012
Gangwon-do Province
South Korea
20-27th May 2012
The Chuncheon International Mime festival featured exciting innovative mime and street performances that showcased the talents of many master performers. The festival offered at least 80 performances from mime troupes from Korea as well as famous international troupes from Taiwan, Denmark, Germany, and other countries.

Title: Project Tank

Name of artists: Michael Croft & Simon Larbalestier

Participants: Konkuk University GLOCAL Campus (Korea) & University of Bridgeport (USA) 2 + 2 Design programs in Graphic Design, Industrial Design and Interior Design

“Images from the Chuncheon Battlefield Memorial represent stages in ongoing educational projects by first year design students generated by the motif of the memorial’s tank. Students are exploring image associations around a set of pre-determined photographic images using digital media. Suggestions of movement are also being explored formally, symbolically and conceptually, through the medium of still-image representation. The project images of the students’ work directed by Simon Larbalestier are static and emblematic, while those directed by Michael Croft imply movement. In the sense that the tank is a motif that viewers walk around, of which students explore and extend the idea of association, viewers are likely to be encouraged to find in the vicinity of the motif, their own associations. In another sense, the tank is a motif that viewers understand through relationship to it of both body and mind. Insofar as mime is a medium that concerns the fundamental connection of mind and body to perception and space, the festival, as an interlude in their project, helps extend these students’ considerations of a motif that has become of visual/material educational interest.”

 

“Project Tank” | Chuncheon International Mime Festival 2012, South Korea.

“Project Tank” | Chuncheon International Mime Festival 2012, South Korea

“Project Tank” | Chuncheon International Mime Festival 2012, South Korea

“Project Tank” | Chuncheon International Mime Festival 2012, South Korea

“Project Tank” | Chuncheon International Mime Festival 2012, South Korea

“Project Tank” | Chuncheon International Mime Festival 2012, South Korea

“Project Tank” | Chuncheon International Mime Festival 2012, South Korea

“Project Tank” | Chuncheon International Mime Festival 2012, South Korea

“Project Tank” | Chuncheon International Mime Festival 2012, South Korea

 

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The Temple of Wax @ Snap Galleries, London | 19th November to 15th January 2011.

A celebration of classic album sleeve art @Snap Galleries, London 19th November to 15th January 2011 – this show includes two large Pixies images: Surfer Rosa and Monkey Gone to Heaven. Go here for the direct link.

Surfer Rosa #1 © Simon Larbalestier

Monkey Gone To Heaven © Simon Larbalestier

The Temple of Wax © Snap Galleries

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A R C H I V E S | new dedicated blog.

A brand new online archives of my photographs dating from 1986 – the present day is now set up on its own dedicated blog with 20 new gallery pages: A R C H I V E S

"About" page from the Archives Blog

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Pixies retrospective exhibition catalogue available for PDF download

Snap Galleries has now updated my exhibition page on their website with prices for all 39 images offered for sale (in three edition sizes) and you can now download the catalogue as PDF here

Pixies Exhibition Catalogue

Me outside Snap Galleries, Piccadilly, London, 17th April 2010. © Guy White

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